Dr. Matthew Bogard, emergency medicine/family medicine, Iowa & Nebraska.

Dr. Matthew Bogard, Nebraska - Iowa

Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska, and Iowa

Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska. Matt Bogard grew up near Omaha, Nebraska. During his time at Nebraska College of Medicine, he was selected to join the Advanced Rural Training Program, a four-year residency program that trains physicians to provide comprehensive full-spectrum medical care. During his residency, Dr. Bogard served on the Board of Directors of the Nebraska Academy of Family Physicians, was active with the Nebraska Medical Association, mentored multiple medical students and was honored by the Nebraska Legislature as “Family Physician of the Day.” Dr. Bogard primarily practices Emergency Medicine.


In addition to treating patients at the Lucas County Health Center, Dr. Matthew Bogard serves rural Iowans as a physician with Emergency Practice Associates in Waterloo. Furthermore, Dr. Matt Bogard is a staff physician at Nebraska’s IHS Winnebago Hospital.


In his free time, Dr. Bogard enjoys piloting his Piper Comanche. He also keeps active via running and bicycling.


EDUCATION


Bachelor in Health Administration and Policy

Bachelor in Biology

Creighton University

Omaha, Nebraska

Doctor of Medicine

University of Nebraska – College of Medicine

Omaha, Nebraska


TRAINING


Served as Chief resident physician in the department of family medicine at the prestigious University of Nebraska Medical Center.


Advanced Rural Training Program

University of Nebraska Medical Center

Omaha, Nebraska


James Leahy Award for Outstanding Medical Student in the Family Medicine department. As a member of the medical school's Delegates organization and Legislative Affairs Committee, Dr. Matthew Bogard became involved in the Nebraska Medical Association and Metro Omaha Medical Society. 


CERTIFICATIONS


Board Certified by the American Academy of Family Physicians

Board Certified by the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons


References:


Website: https://matthewbogardmd.com/

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-matthew-bogard%2C-iowa

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-matthew-bogard

Blog: https://matthewbogardmd.blogspot.com/

LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewbogard/

News: https://hype.news/dr-matthew-bogard/

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Blog Articles by Matthew Bogard, MD

Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska. Matt Bogard grew up near Omaha, Nebraska. During his time at Nebraska College of Medicine, he was selected to join the Advanced Rural Training Program, a four-year residency program that trains physicians to provide comprehensive full-spectrum medical care.

Postpartum Hemorrhage

by Matt Bogard, M.D., Omaha, Nebraska

The physician who chooses to practice obstetrics engages in a physiologic process that has occurred for thousands of years prior to the advent of modern medicine. For the Family Medicine Obstetrician, attending the deliveries of his or her patients further expands on the concept of comprehensive care.


While laboring and vaginal delivery is often a positive experience for patients and providers alike, it is a process wrought with potential consequences that may be devastating to the mother, the fetus, or both. The obstetrician must be vigilant and suspicious of the potential for complications to develop, and must have at his or her disposal appropriate medications, supplies, tools, and personnel for necessary intervention. 


The recent increase in alternative birthing centers, including home deliveries, places the laboring patient in a precarious position – in the event of a complication the attendant may lack the ability to appropriately intervene. These situations have led to recent legal challenges.1,2


Postpartum hemorrhage is a complication of labor that requires immediate aggressive intervention to ensure maternal well-being. Postpartum hemorrhage is classically considered to be blood loss of greater than 500mL during or following the third stage of labor, and has an incidence of nearly 18%.3 Severe postpartum hemorrhage occurs with more than 1 liter of blood loss and occurs in nearly 3% of vaginal deliveries. 


Causes


There are many potential causes of postpartum hemorrhage. Uterine atony is causative in approximately 70% of PPH cases.4 The second most common causative group, seen in 20% of cases, is urogenital trauma in the form of laceration, hematoma, rupture, or uterine inversion. Retained tissue accounts for approximately 10% of postpartum hemorrhage occurrences. A very small minority of hemorrhage is caused by coagulopathy or bleeding diathesis. 


Risk factors


There are multiple risk factors a physician must consider when contemplating the possibility of postpartum hemorrhage. Anemia, easy bruising, clotting disorders, history of prior postpartum hemorrhage, multiple gestation, prolonged third stage of labor, episiotomy, and fetal macrosomia are all contributing factors.5 A retrospective study examining oxytoxin use during labor and the incidence of PPH found women with severe PPH secondary to uterine atony were exposed to significantly more oxytocin during labor when compared to matched controls (10,054 mU AUC compared to 3762 mU AUC in controls).6 This should prompt increased suspicion for PPH in women after a lengthy induction or augmentation. Interestingly, regional epidural analgesia was found to be a protective factor against severe blood loss in women with postpartum hemorrhage.7


Initial resuscitation 


Acute-onset hemorrhage is a situation with which every physician should have comfort in the initial management. Evaluation of the ABCs of life support typically centers on Circulation. Establishment of vascular access via two large-bore peripheral IVs or one central line is necessary and should be followed with immediate fluid resuscitation comprised of isotonic fluids, either Lactated Ringer’s solution or Normal Saline. Oxygen therapy, typically via nonrebreather mask, is initiated along with serial assessment of vital signs. Ongoing brisk bleeding may prompt ordering of complete blood counts, coagulation profile, and type and cross donor blood products in case transfusion later becomes warranted. In one hospital-based study, the prevalence of severe PPH was 2.36%, and the rate of transfusion of blood and blood products was 1.6%.8 In the same study, transfusion of packed red blood cells and blood component therapy was significantly more common in women after caesarean section, compared to those who delivered vaginally. The provider must also beware that blood counts take multiple hours to stabilize after resolved hemorrhage and initial labs may not accurately portray the patient’s status.


Pneumonic Aids


There are two helpful pneumonic aids the astute obstetrician should memorize to guide initial treatment strategies. A recent study9 examined use of the acronym "HEMOSTASIS" in management of the patient with postpartum hemorrhage. HEMOSTASIS includes: ask for Help; Establish etiology; Massage the uterus; Oxytocin infusion and prostaglandins; Shift to operating theater; Tamponade test; Apply compression sutures; Systematic pelvic devascularization; Interventional radiology; Subtotal/total abdominal hysterectomy. Practitioners completing the ALSO course are taught to consider the four causative T’s of the postpartum hemorrhage: Tone, Trauma, Tissue, Thrombin.


Vaginal Delivery Postpartum Hemorrhage 


Active Management, rather than Expectant Management, of the third stage of labor is the single best approach to prevention of postpartum hemorrhage.10 This involves administration of pitocin or other uterotonic shortly after delivery of the anterior shoulder, uterine massage prior to and after placental delivery, and controlled cord traction throughout the third stage. When compared to Expectant Management of the third stage, in which the placenta is allowed to separate either spontaneously or aided only by gravity or nipple stimulation, the Number Needed to Treat with Active Management to prevent one case of PPH is 12.11


Pitocin remains the primary uterotonic of choice in most cases of Active Management of the third stage of labor, in part because it may be given intravenous, intramuscular, or direct injection in the uterine vein. Routine use of misoprostol plus pitocin resulted in modest reductions of blood loss in the third stage of labor in one study, but the effects did not reach statistical significance.12

When postpartum hemorrhage develops following a vaginal delivery, the obstetrician should first assume uterine atony and begin immediate massage, either abdominal massage or bimanual with one hand on the abdomen and one in the vaginal vault compressing the uterus. The labor nurse should simultaneously administer oxytocin. The physician may reasonably elect to also administer 1mg of the Prostaglandin E1, misoprostol, rectally. 


Additional medications available include prostaglandin F-2α, Hemabate, which may be given in patients without history of pulmonary disease, and one of two ergot alkaloids, Methergine and Ergonovine, in patients without underlying hypertension or preeclampsia. 


As the uterus develops tone, a detailed inspection should be undertaken looking for obvious or occult trauma. Dissolvable suture is employed to close any lacerations discovered and achieve hemostasis. A change in vital signs out of proportion to perceived blood loss coupled with pain may represent hematoma formation. Large or enlarging hematomas should be incised and the contained clot evacuated before applying hemostatic suture, often a figure-of-eight.13


The third stage of labor has a mean length of 8-10 minutes and the placenta is considered retained after 30 minutes.14 Umbilical vein injection of oxytocin may accelerate the rate of placental separation. If this fails, manual exploration with a gloved hand is typically the next step, and much easier to complete in the patient with regional anesthesia. Finally, it may become necessary to perform curettage of the uterine cavity.15


If the obstetrician fails to identify a cleavage plane between placenta and uterus, one must suspect invasive placenta, whether it be an accreta, increta, or percreta. The usual treatment is hysterectomy and warrants urgent consultation with an appropriate surgeon.16


Ongoing uterine atony and hemorrhage may be treated with intrauterine balloon tamponade. The Bakri Balloon is a 24-French catheter with a 500mL balloon that has multiple successful case reports.


In a recent study, tamponade catheters controlled postpartum hemorrhage in 18 of 20 cases (90%).17


Finally, less than 1% of postpartum hemorrhage cases is caused by a coagulation disorder. In these cases, treatment involves replacement of deficiencies via appropriate blood products. Packed red blood cells, platelets, and cryoprecipitate or clotting factors may become necessary.


Operative Postpartum Hemorrhage


The surgeon in a Cesarean Section has several additional therapies at his or her disposal. The surgeon is always appropriate to begin with the steps outlined for vaginal deliveries; oxytocin administration, vigorous massage, prostaglandins, and ergot alkaloids.


Uterine compression sutures running through the full thickness of both anterior and posterior uterine walls are a newer operative development for surgical management of uterine atony. Christopher B-Lynch was the first to highlight this procedure. 18 Additional similar techniques have also recently been described, such as the Hayman modification to the B-Lynch procedure.19 Both the B-Lynch and Hayman involve anchoring bilateral absorbable suture in the lower uterine segment and looping over the fundus in an anterior-posterior direction.


A recent paper evaluated in a prospective observational study the use of a "uterine sandwich" technique (B-Lynch uterine compression sutures in association with Bakri intrauterine tamponade balloon) in women with unsuccessful medical treatment for postpartum hemorrhage. The combined technique was successful in avoiding hysterectomy in all studied cases and was without postpartum morbidity.20


The next operative step in controlling postpartum hemorrhage, particularly in cases with adequate uterine tone, is application of bilateral O’Leary sutures to the uterine arteries with zero or number one absorbable sutures.21


An additional potential treatment is bilateral embolization of the uterine arteries, which appears to be an effective means by which to control postpartum hemorrhage, especially when caused by with placenta accreta.22


In cases where all other medical or surgical methods have been employed, total or subtotal hysterectomy is the ultimate solution.


Footnotes


[1] Jose Martinez. “Midwife Who Starred In 'Business Of Being Born' Sued By Parents Who Blame Her For Stillbirth.” New York Daily Times. http://articles.nydailynews.com/2009-10-22/local/17934735_1_midwife-baby-birth.

2 “Midwife Charged in Virginia With Involuntary Manslaughter.” Fox News. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/04/20/midwife-charged-virginia-involuntary-manslaughter/.

3 The Prevention and Management of Postpartum Haemorrhage. WHO Report of Technical Working Group, 1990

4 Hossain N, Shah T, Khan N, Shah N, Khan NH. Transfusion Of Blood And Blood Component Therapy For Postpartum Hemorrhage At A Tertiary Referral Center. J Pak Med Assoc. 2011 Apr;61(4):343-5.

5 Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics Course Syllabus. American Academy of Family Physicians. 2006.

6 Grotegut CA, Paglia MJ, Johnson LN, Thames B, James AH. Oxytocin Exposure During Labor Among Women With Postpartum Hemorrhage Secondary To Uterine Atony. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Jan;204(1):56.e1-6. Epub 2010 Nov 3.

7 Driessen M, Bouvier-Colle MH, Dupont C, Khoshnood B, Rudigoz RC, Deneux-Tharaux C. Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting From Uterine Atony After Vaginal Delivery: Factors Associated With Severity. Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Jan;117(1):21-31.

8 Hossain.

9 Varatharajan L, Chandraharan E, Sutton J, Lowe V, Arulkumaran S.  Outcome Of The Management Of Massive Postpartum Hemorrhage Using The Algorithm "HEMOSTASIS". Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2011 May;113(2):152-4. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

10 Janice M. Anderson, M.D., and Duncan Etches, M.D., “Prevention And Management Of Postpartum Hemorrhage.” American Family Physician. 2007 Mar 15;75(6):875-882.

11 ALSO

12 Fawole AO, Sotiloye OS, Hunyinbo KI, Umezulike AC, Okunlola MA, Adekanle DA, Osamor J, Adeyanju O, Olowookere OO, Adekunle AO, Singata M, Mangesi L, Hofmeyr GJ. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial Of Misoprostol And Routine Uterotonics For The Prevention Of Postpartum Hemorrhage. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2011 Feb;112(2):107-11. Epub 2010 Dec 4.

13 Benrubi C, Neuman C, Nuss RC, Thompson RJ. Vulvar and Vaginal Heatomas: A Retrospective Study of Conservative Versus Operative Management. South Med Journal. 1987; 80(8):991-94

14 ALSO

15 Anderson

16 ALSO

17 Dabelea V, Schultze PM, McDuffie RS Jr. Intrauterine Balloon Tamponade In The Management Of Postpartum Hemorrhage. Am J Perinatol. 2007 Jun;24(6):359-64. Epub 2007 Jun 13.

18 Allam MS, B-Lynch C. The B-Lynch And Other Uterine Compression Suture Techniques. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2005 Jun;89(3):236-41. Epub 2005 Apr 19.

19 Ghezzi F, Cromi A, Uccella S, Raio L, Bolis P, Surbek D. The Hayman Technique: A Simple Method To Treat Postpartum Haemorrhage. BJOG. 2007 Mar;114(3):362-5.

20 Yoong W, Ridout A, Memtsa M, Stavroulis A, Aref-Adib M, Ramsay-Marcelle Z, Fakokunde A.

Application Of Uterine Compression Suture In Association With Intrauterine Balloon Tamponade ("Uterine Sandwich") For Postpartum Hemorrhage. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011 Apr 18. Doi: 10.1111/J.1600-0412.2011.01153.X.

21 ALSO 

22 Jung Hn, Shin Sw, Choi Sj, Cho Sk, Park Kb, Park Hs, Kang M, Choo Sw, Do Ys, Choo Iw.

Uterine Artery Embolization For Emergent Management Of Postpartum Hemorrhage Associated With Placenta Accreta. Acta Radiol. 2011 Mar 28.

Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska.

Iowa Emergency Medical Services Medical Director Training

Qualifies to serve as Medical Director to EMS agencies

Doctor Matthew Bogard, Board Certified in Family Medicine and Board Eligible in Emergency Medicine, recently completed advanced training presented by the Iowa Bureau of Emergency and Trauma Services with an eye toward providing additional services to EMS agencies in rural locations. 


The single day course reviewed Iowa Code governing Emergency Medical Services, types of agencies and classifications of responders, additional resources necessary for Critical Care Transport Services, and the importance of an EMS Contingency Plan. Training was also provided regarding the Iowa EMS provider scope of practice.


According to Dr. Bogard, “Emergency Medicine doctors interact with first responders, Emergency Medical Technicians, and Paramedics on a daily basis. We receive patients they have evaluated and cared for, often providing lifesaving treatments. In many cases rely on EMS services to not only transport patients to the Emergency Room but also transfer them elsewhere, sometimes over great distances. It is important to have a strong and supportive working relationship with the Emergency Medical Services departments in the areas you work.”


About Dr. Matthew Bogard


A native of Omaha, Nebraska, Dr. Matthew Bogard practices emergency medicine at multiple hospitals including in Omaha, Nebraska, and at Lucas County Health Center in Chariton, Iowa. Presently, he is Board Certified in Family Medicine by the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Bogard is Board-Eligible in Emergency Medicine and is on pace track to be dual-boarded in the near future.
 

Website: https://matthewbogardmd.com/

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-matthew-bogard%2C-iowa

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-matthew-bogard

Blog: https://matthewbogardmd.blogspot.com/

LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewbogard/

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Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska

Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska

Matthew Bogard, MD completes Grain Bin Rescue Training

Doctor one of very few physicians to complete this important scenario-based lifesaving class

Doctor Matthew Bogard, Board Certified in Family Medicine and Board Eligible in Emergency Medicine, recently completed an in-depth hands-on course to learn the intricacies of rescuing victims of grain bin entrapment. This often happens when a farmer enters the grain bin while the unload auger is running – typically to address a plugged auger – and becomes stuck in the moving grain. 


The class taught the importance of safety tie-off anchor points, how to safely walk on stored grain, and appropriate ways to rescue entrapped victims. If the person is visible inside the top of the grain bin, a cofferdam is built around the victim after first securing them with rope to prevent further movement. Grain is then removed from within the cylinder surrounding the victim until they are able to walk out. When a victim becomes completely submerged, large V-shaped cuts are created symmetrically around the bin and grain is removed as fast as safely possible to reach the victim.


“This is an important class for any emergency medicine doctor practicing in rural areas,” says Dr. Bogard. “It was a great review of the mechanics of what happens combined with the hands-on scenario where I strapped into a harness and helped rescue a fellow classmate from a specially-constructed grain bin simulator.”


About Dr. Matthew Bogard


A native of Omaha, Nebraska, Dr. Matthew Bogard practices emergency medicine at multiple hospitals including Lucas County Health Center in Chariton, Iowa. Presently, he is Board Certified in Family Medicine by the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Bogard is Board-Eligible in Emergency Medicine and is on pace track to be dual-boarded in the near future.
 

His training as a medical professional began at Creighton University, from which he graduated cum laude as a Bachelor of Science in Health Administration and Policy with an additional focus in Biology. Following this, Dr. Matthew Bogard received his Doctor of Medicine from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine and gained further experience as a resident physician and later chief resident physician in the Department of Family Medicine at the prestigious University of Nebraska Medical Center.
 

In addition to treating patients at the Lucas County Health Center, Dr. Matthew Bogard serves rural Iowans and Nebraskans at hospitals which include Knoxville Area Community Hospital, CHI Missouri Valley, Burgess Memorial Hospital, OrthoNebraska Hospital, and IHS Winnebago Hospital.

*** Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska. During his time at Nebraska College of Medicine, he was selected to join the Advanced Rural Training Program, a four-year residency program that trains physicians to provide comprehensive full-spectrum medical care. During his residency, Dr. Bogard served on the Board of Directors of the Nebraska Academy of Family Physicians, was active with the Nebraska Medical Association, mentored multiple medical students and was honored by the Nebraska Legislature as “Family Physician of the Day.” Matthew Bogard primarily practices Emergency Medicine.

Website: https://matthewbogardmd.com/

News: https://medicogazette.com/dr-matthew-bogard%2C-iowa

News: https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-matthew-bogard

Blog: https://matthewbogardmd.blogspot.com/

LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewbogard/

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Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska

Dr. Matthew Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska

Why you should consider getting a flu shot

Dr. Matthew Bogard

Its fall and that means that the flu season is upon us. Some of you may have already gotten the flu vaccine, but for those who haven’t it’s not too late. For the most part, we underestimate the seriousness of the flu and place it next to the common cold. This is a common misconception, but just so you know, the Influenza virus is considerably more serious in nature. 


As per CDC estimates, it has caused between 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and as many as 12,000 and 56,000 deaths annually in the U.S. since 2010.  A yearly flu vaccine is the first step towards gaining protection against this disease and the CDC recommends it for everyone who is 6 months of age and older. 


What can the flu do?


Initially, flu viruses will infect your nose, throat and lungs, but it can go on to cause a wide range of complications. While sinus and ear infections are moderate complications, Pneumonia is a serious flu complication that arises either due to the flu infection itself or if you’re simultaneously infected by bacteria as well as the flu virus. Other more serious complications include inflammation of the heart, brain or muscle. It can also cause multi-organ failure. An extreme inflammatory response can result in sepsis. 


In the past 7 flu seasons, influenza vaccination prevented around 5.3 million illnesses and 85,000 hospitalizations and as per the CDC a mere 5% increase in the number of vaccinations could have further prevented as many as 483,000 influenza illnesses/. It would have stopped another two hundred thousand plus influenza-associated medical visits, and around seven thousand influenza-associated hospitalizations across the U.S.A. 


Who is at risk?


While anyone can get the flu, some people are susceptible to a more severe form of infection. These include:


* Children younger than 5 years old, particularly those that are younger than 2 years old

* People older than 65 years old

* People suffering from asthma or chronic lung disease

* People with neurological conditions, heart disease and those suffering from blood, liver, kidney, endocrine and metabolic disorders

* People whose immune system has recently been compromised due to an illness

* Pregnant women 


How effective is the flu shot? 


Since there are different strains of the influenza virus each year, the flu vaccine needs to be modified accordingly to target the particular strain that will circulate that year. However, there is no way of knowing which strain it might be. Thus, the effectiveness of the vaccine is somewhat compromised.  Despite this, the CDC still heavily recommends that you get the flu vaccine as it offers at least some degree of protection even if it’s not completely effective in preventing the disease. Also, since the influenza virus is transmittable, it is logical to assume that if a fewer number of people get sick, then the virus won’t be able to penetrate as deeply and spread.


Besides CDC, other professional medical groups like the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases and the American Medical Association also recommend an annual flu vaccine. 


What flu vaccines are available for 2018-2019?


There are several options for the 2018-2019 flu season, these include:

* Standard dose flu shots given into the muscle. A needle is used to inject these, but for some people between the ages of 18 and 64 years old, a jet injector can be used.

* Shots made with adjuvant. These are suitable for older people.

* Shots made the help of virus previously grown via cell culture technique.

* Shots made using vaccine production technology. These do not employ the flu virus and follow a different mechanism.

* The nasal spray vaccine, also known as the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). This is recommended for use in non-pregnant individuals between the ages of 2 and 49 years. People with underlying medical conditions are advised against using the nasal spray flu vaccine. 


What are the side-effects?


The influenza vaccine is made from an inactivated or weakened version of the influenza virus so you might experience flu-like symptoms post vaccination. These will subside however, and you won’t suffer from a full bout of the flu. 


There may also be some redness or swelling in the arm that was administered the flu shot, and low-grade fever. The side-effects are not really a matter of concern because really it just means that the vaccine is working and will be able to protect you from the actual virus. 


Will last year’s flu shot work?


No. There are two reasons for this. First, the immune response generated by last year’s vaccine has gradually declined. Therefore, you need to be injected with a new one for continued protection. Another thing with the flu virus is that it is constantly changing in form. The flu vaccine is also analyzed accordingly and redesigned to combat new forms of the virus each year.


Where can you get one?


Flu vaccines are easily available at doctor’s offices, clinics, pharmacies and college health centers. Many employers and schools offer them as well. It is recommended to get a flu shot before the virus starts spreading in your community as it takes around 2 weeks for your body to build up a sufficient immune response to protect you from it. If you’re looking to get one, it is best not to wait around and get one as soon as possible to ensure maximum protection. 


When should you avoid a flu shot?


While the CDC recommends that anyone older than 6 months get the flu shot, including pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions, there are exceptions. If you’re severely allergic to the components in the flu shot then you should not get vaccinated. If you have ever had the Guillan-Barré Syndrome (An immune disorder), then consult your doctor before getting a flu shot. 


One of the components involved in the manufacturing of flu vaccines are eggs but as per the CDC, even if you suffer from egg allergies, you can still get the flu shot. In case your allergies are serious and you are concerned side effects from vaccinations, please consult your doctor. 


*** Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska. During his time at Nebraska College of Medicine, he was selected to join the Advanced Rural Training Program, a four-year residency program that trains physicians to provide comprehensive full-spectrum medical care. During his residency, Dr. Bogard served on the Board of Directors of the Nebraska Academy of Family Physicians, was active with the Nebraska Medical Association, mentored multiple medical students and was honored by the Nebraska Legislature as “Family Physician of the Day.” Matthew Bogard primarily practices Emergency Medicine.


Website: https://matthewbogardmd.com/

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Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska

Dr. Matt Bogard practices Emergency Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska